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The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker HD

Zelda Series Character Guide by Canadian Dude

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/\ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /________________\ /\ /\ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /________________\/________________\ ZELDA SERIES CHARACTER GUIDE by Jacob Rothenburger =~=TABLE OF CONTENTS=~= Introduction [INT] Version History [VER] Zelda Series Overview [SUM] The Meat of the Guide [MEA] Races Compendium [RAC] Ladies’ Man [LAD] Thanks [THA] Legal Garbage [LEG] Contact Information [CON] In Closing [INC] Those numbers in [ ] are to allow you to quickly access the part of the guide you want to view. Use your Ctrl+F function (on John Hodgemans, I’m not sure what it is for Jason Longs) to jump to where you need to be. For example, if you wanted to see the Billy Bob section, whose code was [BIL], you would press Ctrl+F, then type in ‘[BIL]’, then click ‘Find Next’ twice. Boom! There you are! It saves on scrolling through the whole document to find what you need. =~=INTRODUCTION=~= [INT] The Legend of Zelda is my favourite video game series, bar none. I am a FAQs author. It follows that I would want to write a Legend of Zelda FAQs. Unfortunately for me, I’m far from the only one who subscribes to this way of thinking. Quite a few other people like Zelda, too. And I'm not up to doing a walkthrough. These two factors combined mean that any walkthrough I were to write just wouldn’t be able to compete. So in a way, I guess this guide is my way around that. Because I’m pro at NPCs. I actually consider myself a walking encyclopaedia of the Zelda universe – I’m a real ‘ask me anything’ kind of guy when we’re talking Zelda. That’s not arrogance, it’s just the truth. Well ok, it’s also arrogance. So, inspired by various other Nintendo-franchise character and ending guides (props to them), I composed this one. Snazzy, isn’t it? Of course, I’m not nearly as talented as some of those authors, but I hope you enjoy my work as much as I've enjoyed theirs. And when you're done, check out their stuff as well. The very first version of this guide contained 69 entries. Obviously, that is far, far fewer than the number of characters in the series. But most of them are just not important enough to merit lengthening the guide; if I actually went over every single one, we’d have a document 1,000 gigs long, and it would be mostly uninteresting and redundant. Speaking of redundancy, some characters have been culled to keep the thing from growing too long. But back to what I was saying, initially I viewed various resources to find lists of characters. Characters were considered for inclusion if they met one of the following criteria: (1) It played a significant role in the storyline of at least one Zelda game (2) It played multiple roles of moderate importance (storyline or otherwise) (3) It intrigues me personally This method held up very well for the first few versions, at which point I unconsciously changed the rule to 'any named character' (and with entries like Flute Boy’s, even that boundary is starting to fray). And if I didn’t happen to know what it was, it’s not in the guide. On top of that, my new method only applies to games from Twilight Princess onward (at which point I started playing new games consciously thinking about which characters would go in and what I might write about them while still playing through.) As you can see, the basis for selection is painfully arbitrary. If you take a look and you see that this guide lacks a character you believe should be included, please let me know. That about wraps it up. Onward, and enjoy. =~=Version History=~= [VER] :-Version 1.0 (11.13.06)-: The initial version of this guide; the state it was in when first posted on GameFAQs. :-Version 1.1 (12.17.06)-: I’m never rushing another guide. Trying to get this one out left large gaps, an inability to edit for errors before posting and some entertaining but scandalous silliness, such as my having accidentally left the placeholder ‘DATE GOES HEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEERE’ for the date index for Version 1.0. So I’ve fixed most of those. -Created a few new character entries (Grog, Zephos and Cyclos, and some characters from Tingle RPG), edited some others and created a whole new section, the Races Compendium. -Some other information has been added as well, mostly little things. :-Version 1.2 (02.09.07)-: Finally added all the information for Twilight Princess, added some profiles I neglected to put in from before, and fixed some errors. :-Version 1.3 (05.03.10)—: Didn’t manage to get it out in time for Spirit Tracks, but everything’s in there now. Edited for accuracy and readability. Changed ‘Boss Bokoblin’ to ‘King Bulblin.’ Added information for Phantom Hourglass and some Mogitate Chinkuru characters; about freaking time. A ton more profiles from other games went in as well, including some I can’t believe I forgot. :-Version 1.4 (xx.yy.12)-: A few characters went in who should have already been there, but more significantly I've finally (finally!) added the information for Mogitate Chinkuru, Irodzuki Chinkuru and Skyward Sword. This is my biggest update yet. =~=Zelda Series Overview=~= [SUM] Before we get to the character section itself, I thought I’d give you a brief look at the Zelda series as a whole. New players might have trouble keeping up, and returning ones might like a recap, so hopefully this section will help you avoid confusion. If you’re a seasoned Hyrulean veteran, you can feel free to skip right over this section, or read it for posterity. It’s probably worth a skim. There are a couple of things to keep in mind here. Mainly, there is NO one definitive timeline for the Zelda series. Certainly, there was one published on zelda.com years back, in 2011 Aonuma's team released the completely nonsensical one they've been using internally, and you can devise innumerable fan timelines if you apply certain rules to the universe (Kirby021591’s is one of the best; check out any of his Zelda walkthroughs to find it), but really, it’s all guesswork. Aonuma Eiji, the dude currently in charge of the Zelda franchise, has stated he eventually intends to solidify the overarching story, but I’ll believe it when I see it. It’s probably most convenient to think of each game as self-contained, except in instances where the events of one game explicitly reference others (for example, Majora’s Mask is irrefutably a direct sequel to Ocarina of Time) to make a pair. I could say a lot more on the subject, but I’ll contain myself. The next issue is caused by the first. Many weapons, items and –characters-recur from one game to the next. Sometimes it’s possible they’re the same thing (for instance, How many Mirror Shields can there possibly be? one must ask oneself) whereas others are cosmetically different but functionally identical items, like certain bows. Others, like the Hookshot, may just be variations on the same design. It’s impossible to know. As for characters, many of them appear in multiple time periods. Some just live a really long time (Impa, the Great Deku Tree, Jr), some apparently time-travel (Tingle) and still others have no explanation for their presence (Beedle, Zill.) Oh yeah, and of course some have alternate-universe, ancient ancestor, or reincarnation versions. Sifting through endless layers of ambiguity is fun, no? The years of release are for the North American versions. Actually, I guess just about all the information in this guide comes from the North American versions, but anyway other regions may be different. The Legend of Zelda Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu Nintendo Entertainment System Released: 1986 Since there’s no clear storyline, let’s look at them one-by-one, in the order that they emerged in the real world. That means we kick-start the section with the original Legend of Zelda. Being that it’s the first one in the series, it’s hard to write about, because if you look at it from an industry standpoint, everything’s an innovation, and if you look at it from a series standpoint, everything’s a franchise standard. But look! I just took up a whole paragraph talking about the paragraph itself! Well played, self. *congratulates self* I might as well say SOMETHING, though, so let’s do a brief overview. Ganon, evil pig lord and main villain of the series, possesses the Triforce of Power, and seeks to earn the Triforce of Wisdom as well. (No Triforce of Courage, that came later.) But it was Princess Zelda who had Wisdom, and when he tried to take it from her, she magically broke it into eight pieces and hid the shards in a collection of dangerous catacombs throughout Hyrule. On a chance encounter, Zelda’s handmaiden Impa apprised a lad named Link of the situation, and he took charge, recovered the pieces after many harrowing adventures, and finally gained the power to face Ganon head-on. In the process, he introduced many elements that would later become Zelda staples, like the acquisition of tools, inevitable confrontations with bosses and the magic number eight (in regards to the number of dungeons a game contains, plus the final level.) Hmm...on second thought, I guess that wasn’t so hard to write about, after all. Zelda II: The Adventure of Link Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Rinku no Bouken Nintendo Entertainment System Released: 1988 Man, I hate this game so much. I finally got a copy almost four years ago, and I’m still stuck on the fourth level. (Edit: I did eventually beat it.) If I wanted Castlevania-style gameplay, I would play Castlevania. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, Zelda II is completely different from others in the series. Others have a top-down or 3D perspective, but Zelda II has a top-down overworld view, then switches to an action side-scroller for random battle and dungeon sequences. This is because it wasn’t an adventure game, but an action-RPG – and I myself was skilled in neither the action nor the RPG genre. For me, this game is frickin’ HARD (while I laughed out loud when I read that someone had tried over twenty times to beat Ganon in Ocarina of Time – I did it one try and only took about ten hearts of damage, and I know that’s a lot worse than some people. It all depends on your personal skills, eh?) But on the bright side, Zelda II (stupid, stupid title) introduced magic spells to Link’s arsenal, some of which are VERY cool, to say nothing of the exceptionally well-done finale. The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Kamigami no Toraifousu Super Nintendo Entertainment System Released: 1992 Ha ha, get it? Get it?? A Link to the Past is the second of three Zelda games with irritating English titles. It was renamed because Triforce of the Gods sounded too religious. But let’s move on, before my trend of failing to talk about the game itself gets out of hand. Past is one of the games that many consider to be the best in the series. The pak made the important contribution of the Master Sword, which has stood long since – the first Zelda had a Magical Sword, but who knows what the story is there. Though not in terms of hours, it’s also the longest to date: There was an introductory dungeon, then a set of three, then a set of seven and THEN the final boss dungeon. But what really set it apart was its Light World/Dark World feature. You see, the Golden Land of the Triforce was originally a mirror image of Hyrule (the Light World), with minor differences. Ganon’s evil transformed it into the Dark World. You eventually gained the ability to travel between the two, and navigating the world suddenly became insanely fun. Use the Rooster to fly to Death Mountain...plumb the depths of the caves...come out on a ledge near a portal to the Dark World...jump down a ways...use the Magic Mirror to return to the Light World...then go left a ways and you’re there at last. True story. The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Yume wo Miru Shima Gameboy Released: 1993 Apparently as a result of player demand, the Big N finally cranked out some portable Moblin-bashing. By some interpretations, Link’s Awakening is a direct sequel to A Link to the Past. Either way, on a voyage to condition his body and mind in preparation for possible future catastrophes, Link is shipwrecked and wakes up on Koholint Island. I don’t know what a Koholint is, but the Japanese title seems to literally be ‘island that sees a dream,’ or Dreaming Island (I’m a learner of Japanese.) Anyway, Koholint Island is quite an interesting place, from the giant egg that sits on its tallest mountain to the village populated entirely by talking animals. Link quested to enter the egg with the eight Instruments of the Sirens, and find a way back home. I like this game a lot. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Toki no Okarina Nintendo 64 Released: 1998 Probably the most popular Zelda title. I can see why, but...amazing graphics aren’t everything, guys. (And you young ones snickering at them? Shut up. They were stupendous at the time.) At any rate, the level design is more than competent and the mix of old and new is commendable. Ocarina of Time built on some of the core elements of A Link to the Past, including its 3/5 dungeon dichotomy, the method by which the Master Sword is gained, and the dual-world scheme – though in this case, it’s the present and future of the same world rather than two separate worlds, and your ability to switch between the two is severely limited. Anyway, a fine entry indeed. The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Majora no Kamen Nintendo 64 Released: 2000 Ocarina of Time was so well received, they decided to release a direct sequel to it, utilising the same engine and resources. To me, this makes Ocarina that much less special, but once I got into it (Majora’s Mask takes a while to get moving) I ended up liking it even better. This one is set in a parallel version of Hyrule, called Termina. They have a somewhat similar world. You’ll meet many of the same characters, this time with names, but Termina is more tribal than civic. Oh yeah, and the game’s main antagonist has set the moon on a collision course that will obliterate the planet, plus Hyrule. The three-day time limit can be reset again and again, but this also resets events – all you’ll keep is the items you’ve collected, which is enough. The jury’s out on this one; you’ll find the three-day system either brilliant, or annoying as hell. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Fushigi no Ko no Mi Daichi no Shou Gameboy Colour Released: 2001 During development, Oracle of Seasons and Ages were originally called ‘gaiden,’ meaning side-stories. That’s not entirely inaccurate. You could even go as far as to say they were just to keep players going between console entries, but even if that’s true they are still excellent standalone adventures. Nut of the Mysterious Tree: Chapter of Earth is the easier and less interesting of the two. This one tracked Link as he used the Rod of Seasons, a magical device that he could use to change the seasons at will, to deny General Onox his dream of conquering Holodrum. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Fushigi no Ko no Mi Jikuu no Shou Gameboy Colour Released: 2001 Released concurrently with Oracle of Seasons, Nut of the Mysterious Tree: Chapter of Time and Space is more puzzle-oriented, and probably the superior game overall. We were a little squeamish when we found out that Zelda had been handed out to Capcom, but it all turned out all right. Link gained the Harp of Ages, another time-travelling instrument – as well as one that allowed another dual-world system, this one being the present and 400 years in the past. Link used it to fight the Sorceress Veran as she strove to conquer Labrynna. The biggest feature of the Oracle games was that when you completed one, you got a password. This password could be entered into the other game when you started a new file, allowing you to start off with the Wooden Sword (instead of looking for it) and an extra Heart Container. It also unlocked additional content and many special items unavailable the first time through. The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Yottsu no Tsurugi Gameboy Advance Released: 2002 When A Link to the Past was re-released for GBA, it also included a small, multiplayer-only game on the same pak. It introduced a new villain, Vaati, and had the players attempt madcap challenges as they cooperated to complete a level, yet competed to collect the most Rupees. While it got even more fun as more players were added, most people who bought the re-release probably didn’t have the hardware needed for Four Swords. The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Kaze no Takuto Nintendo GameCube Released: 2003 Despite its obvious flaws, The Wind Waker is my favourite Zelda game. Some people will blanch at that statement, but I love it, and I’m letting you know, even though you don’t need to. Although that name...Waker is not technically a word. (Neither is GameCube, of course...) Anyway, for some reason which I won’t spoil, the game does not take place in our usual Hyrule, but on the high seas. As a result, your adventure involves a fair bit of searching for sunken treasure, firing cannon and exploring small islands in a cel-shaded, superlively world that really irked a lot of people. But if you wanted realism, boy, did you ever pick the wrong series. Another area of complaint was that travelling across the ocean was too boring. I thought it was neat, myself. Fortunately this isn’t a critical review, or we’d be here forever as I argued my case. The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Adventures Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Yottsu no Tsurugi Purasu Nintendo GameCube Released: 2004 Not only did Four Swords+ expand on the original and bring it to a console, it also offered the option of a single-player mode that didn’t require a GBA or the GCN-GBA cable. Pretty sweet. The story is quite similar, but the game is much, much, much longer, and will probably take about 20 hours to complete rather than an hour and a half. Each stage takes about twenty minutes, I’d say. There’s also a shallow yet intense battle mode. The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Fushigi no Boushi Gameboy Advance Released: 2005 The title’s Mysterious Hat is Ezlo, who has a great plot that you can read about in the guide itself if you want it spoiled for you. When we meet him, Ezlo finds Link in the forest, latches onto his head just like a Metroid, and gives him access to yet another dual-world system. This time, our boy can go ‘twixt the Hylian-sized world and that of the inch-high Minish people. From this unique vantage point, Hyrule doubles in size as you explore huge dungeons stretching almost a metre in any direction. This innovative use of the diminutive form gets a thumbs-up from me, but like The Wind Waker, whose general style it follows, it is so short I have to wonder if development was rushed. Freshly-Picked! Tingle’s Rosy Rupee Land Japanese: Mogitate Chinkuru no Barairo Rupiirando Nintendo DS Released: 2006 Personally I prefer the more literal translation of ‘rose-coloured’ over ‘rosy,’ but, even though they place a hyphen where there shouldn’t be one, we’ll go with what the PAL version says – for the rest of the guide I’ve been going NTSC, that being my region (points to own username), but we in NA never got a version to call our own, evidently due to a lack of demand. I finally found a copy while on exchange, though I used the PAL translation to write the appropriate profiles. The game is a fascinating departure from the mainline series, focussing on Tingle and the lunacy that tends to follow him around. The DS's various features are put to hitherto unseen uses that are, more importantly, both creative and fun, as Tingle scours the land for ever-increasing amounts of Rupees in order to pay the toll to enter the magical Rupee Land. The plot is surprisingly robust, and the boss battles are par excellence. The Legend of Zelda: Twilight Princess Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Towairaito Purinsesu Nintendo GameCube/Wii Released: 2006 This game broke ground in several ways: It was the first game to receive an ESRB evaluation more dangerous than E (it got a T rating), for example, and it was the first to be released on two consoles concurrently. I won’t get into all the reasons why the game irked me, because we’d be here for a year, but they are definitely there. Despite this, the game is still really good. It marks a return to the inexplicably popular 'realistic' style, a much darker tone, a heavier emphasis on storytelling, a Hyrule under siege by another plane of existence, and a cool new mechanic in the shape of Link’s ability to assume wolf form. Tingle’s Balloon Fight Japanese: Chinkuru no Baruun Faito Nintendo DS Released: 2007 Club Nintendo is Nintendo of Japan’s consumer incentive programme, offering a certain number of ‘points’ with each purchase, which can then be redeemed for sweet merchandise. I guess it’s ok that they come up with really cool stuff to give out to dedicated customers as a little thank-you for their patronage, but it’s really hard to actually earn any kind of significant number of points, and they’re always coming out with wicked must-have items that nearly all of us can never have. And in particular, I’d vaguely feel like my Zelda collection was somehow incomplete without this little...thing...even though it’s pretty much just a retread of a mildly popular 80’s NES game with Tingle cast as the new main character. Luckily, I am armed with a fan’s grave dedication and an eBay account. It’s the second NTSC-J game to make its way into my hoard, being that it’s JP-only. The plastic it was wrapped in said 'SECOND SALE' on it, so I think its previous owner must himself have bought it at Book-Off or something. Oh, incidentally, let’s say a few words about the game itself. Fly around, pop balloons, send your opponent hurtling towards the ground to their death, strike globophobia into the hearts of your enemies. The Legend of Zelda: Phantom Hourglass Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Mugen no Sunadokei Nintendo DS Released: 2007 Series creator Miyamoto expressed a desire to create a fully touch-driven Zelda game, and he delivered. The system was certainly far from perfect; I think if the title had come farther along in the system’s life, once Nintendo had had more of a chance to test total touch control with other properties, it would have been a lot better. As it is, despite a few grating issues, the overall result is not bad at all. It’s kinda cool, moving Link around with the stylus, and some of his tools and weapons are implemented very cleverly. The game is ridiculously easy, though, and despite being a direct sequel to The Wind Waker, it draws next to no reference to that game, instead focussing on the shenanigans of Link and new companions Ciela and Linebeck as they search for truth and money, respectively. The titular object of significance holds the sand that slowly sifts away but allows Link to venture into the deep Temple of the Ocean King, the supposed ‘one big dungeon’ we’d heard so much about but turned out to be kind of unimpressive. Whatever; like Metroid II for GameBoy, it’s not a fantastic entry in the series, but is still one of the better games for the system. Link’s Crossbow Training Japanese: Rinku no Bougan Toreiningu Wii Released: 2008 Less a game and more a tech demo, Link’s Crossbow Training was packaged with the Wii Zapper peripheral to entice people to buy it. The boys and girls in Marketing were right about me wanting the game, but wrong about me being willing to shell out for a Zapper to get it...or so I thought! Tragically, my desire for a new copy eventually came to outweigh my patience. Since it’s a side-game, it’s fairly simplistic: In a world based on the Twilight Princess aesthetic (GameCube version), we help Link brush up on his skills with the ol’ repeating crossbow, in various galleries and even some brief dungeons, where he must vanquish his enemies not through skilful swordsmanship, but by shooting them in the face. Going for all Platinum medals is really, really fun. The Legend of Zelda: Spirit Tracks Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Daichi no Kiteki DS Released: 2009 I may have had my misgivings with Phantom Hourglass, but Train Whistle of the Earth addresses nearly all of them. What’s more, it’s quite simply just a much more well-rounded game. If uniqueness were quantifiable, which it grammatically isn’t, Spirit Tracks would be one of the most unique games in the series. Its central mechanic revolves around operating a steam engine, which is not only a huge jump in technology but something totally unlike anything we’ve ever done in a Zelda game before. I just hope this doesn’t mean we’re taking the FFVI-VIII route with the series...although I guess that could work out. Spirit Tracks may also connect the earlier games, storyline-wise, with the more ‘modern’ ones, as it concerns the fate of the country that the Link and Zelda of the Great Sea founded. Ripening Tingle’s Balloon Trip of Romantic Love Japanese: Irozuki Chinkuru no Koi no Baruun Torippu DS Released: 2009 If this game has any relation to the first Tingle-centric outing, it is perhaps a prequel. Whereas the last one had the whole RPG schwerve going, this one had the ‘old-school point-and-click adventure game’ formula that fans of the late 90s are always complaining there aren’t enough of anymore. It’s a loose take-off of The Wizard of Oz, which really turns me off of it, but if it’s even tangentially Zelda you know I’m going to enjoy it on principle. This time we're on a road trip, making it, I guess, Zelda's answer to Grim Fandango; the 'love' of the title refers to Tingle's quest to get some, by giving the ladies in his life thousands' of Rupees worth of stupid trinkets. Study up. More interestingly, he is eventually accompanied by three companions, who provide both interesting dialogue and their personal skills and abilities. The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Sukaiwaado Soudo Wii Released: 2011 The fascinating lovechild of The Wind Waker, Twilight Princess, Metroid Prime 3: Corruption, and Super Mario Galaxy, the Zelda game with the most euphemistic title is also riddled with a host of technical issues and design choices that mar an otherwise happy adventure, delightful adventure. (And that's not just me complaining about Nintendo changing stuff. Some of the changes are actually just legitimately bad.) It makes up for it, though, with beautiful visuals and an engaging plot, focussing on how the Master Sword originally came to be. Although it completely contradicts everything we knew about Master Sword lore up to that point, it really is a fun story. Spoils are back, and adventuring is even less lonely than ever thanks to a spirit companion who, while kind of a moron, is well-intentioned and helpful. The most interesting development to the Zelda formula is in the structure: Getting there is now well over half the fun, with the preceding environments providing much of what we used to get from dungeons, while the dungeons themselves are now much shorter and sweeter. I have to say I'm curious to see what else Nintendo will try, and if it will continue with this adjusted ratio or if Skyward Sword will stand out as a one-time experiment. --A Note on Main Series versus Side Series-- Here’s a mildly interesting story about how a minor FAQs-writing problem led me to an observation about Zelda games that will be interesting to only the hardest of hardcore fans, and maybe not even them, so you may want to skip this section altogether. I won’t be mad. The classification between main games and side games was nonexistent until Nintendo released a handful of the latter. Specifically, I’m talking about the Zapper game and Tingle’s three games. Two are gaiden (side stories), but the other two are plotless extras. This presented a problem that took me some time to figure out. Every character has a chronological list of all the games they’ve made an appearance in. I obviously can’t just ignore these games, but I really didn’t want to uglify the lists by shoving them in there haphazardly. It really didn’t feel right putting ‘Freshly Picked Tingle’s Rose-Coloured Rupeeland’ up next to the likes of ‘Twilight Princess.’ I came up with the solution when the other two games came out. These three, I realise, don’t begin with the phrase ‘Zeruda no Densetsu.’ This strongly reminded me of the Kirby series, another Nintendo favourite. In Japan, the titles of all main-series Kirby games begin with ‘Hoshi no Kaabii,’ Kirby of the Stars. The ‘side games,’ ones that see Kirby playing puyo or engaging in competitive cartoon star-racing, don’t have the ‘Hoshi no Kaabii.’ The rule doesn’t work perfectly with the English titles, but I figured out I could apply a similar rule to Zelda. Tingle’s game doesn’t start with ‘Zeruda no Densetsu.’ It’s not a main game; neither is its sequel, such as it is. The other two don’t even have plots. I now have grounds to remove them from the main list, and make a separate list. This serves the additional purpose of preserving certain claims of mine, such as that Princess Zelda has appeared in every Zelda game. Every LEGEND OF Zelda game. Wikipedia, separately, picked up on this too, and made the same classification. Great minds. For me, this was an interesting adventure in FAQs-writing, and a fascinating development in Zelda as a brand. =~=The Meat of the Guide=~= [MEA] Okay, we’ve finally arrived! This is the reason you came here. Below is a list of every character profiled in this guide. There’s quite a few of them, eh? To jump to a specific character, use the Find function, and type the first three or so letters of their name with a space between them. So to find Mario’s entry (to be clear, Mario doesn’t actually have an entry, this is just an example), you would hit Ctrl+F, search for ‘M A R’, and click Find. Teleport! *Twilight Zone three-tone theme plays* Some characters share lots of letters with others, so you may need to do more than three, or maybe they use rare letters and a mere two will do the trick. Until I come up with a way to give characters a code that doesn’t have to be changed every time I add new entries, this is all I got for you. I apologize for the inconvenience. If you think there’s a notable absence, just search for the name normally and you may find that rather than take up space with their own gratuitous profile, a character has been incorporated into somebody else’s. By the way, need I actually say that this guide contains huge spoilers for basically every game in the series? ??? Agahnim Agitha Alfonzo Anjean Anju and Kafei Ankle Anouki Aroo Astrid Azusa Bagu Balloon Fighter Barkle Barnes Baron Batreaux Beaver Brothers Beedle Belari Bellum Bertie and Luv Biggoron and Medigoron Bipin and Blossom Blade Brothers Blaino Blind the Thief Bodyguards Bosom Oak Bridge-builders Bridge Worker Brocco and Pina Bronzi Bombers Gang Bug-Catching Kid Buriki Byrne Cannon Captain Keeta Captain Stalfos Carlov and Borlov Carpenters Cawlin and Strich Chancellor Cole Charlo Chef Bear Chris Houlihan Christine Chudley Ciela Cobal Composer Brothers Coro Crazy Tracy Croo Cubus Sisters Cucco Lady Daltus Dampe Dan and Jon Dark Link Darmani Darunia David Jr. Dazzle Lyphos Dekadin Deku Royal Family Demise Demon Train Din, Nayru and Farore Doc Bandam Dodoh Dokutaa Jii Don Gero Dovos Dr Bean Eagus Ederuwaisu Emera Engineer Epona Error Explorers Ezlo Facade Fado Fanadi Ferrus Fi First Mate Fledge Florence Flute Boy Four Sisters and their Otentou Freedle Fuzo Fyer and Falbi Gabora and Zubora Gaepora Ganon General Onox Gestari Ghirahim Ghost Ringleader Golden Chief Cylos Golo Gondo Gongoron Good Bee Gorko the Goron Goron Elder Gortram Gossack Grand Fairy and her Retainers Great Deku Tree Great Fairy Grog Groose Guld Gully Gureeto Guru-Guru Gustaf, Royal Spirit Hanch Happy Mask Salesman Helmaroc King Hena Henya Hero’s Spirit Higemonban Honcho Honey and Darling Hot Rodder Goron Hylia Igos du Ikana Iiguru Iijima Ilia Impa Indigo-Gos Ingo Instructor Horwell Instructor Owlan Iona Nattsubaiyaa Iris Ishideesu Iza Jabu-Jabu Jakamar Jalhalla, Protector of the Seal Jiichan and Baachan Jijii Jinmenjuu Joanne Jolene Jovani Junglo Kagoron Kaepora Gaebora Kakashi Kamaro Kamo Karane Keaton Kiki Kili, Hanna, and Misha Killer Bees Kina King Bulblin King Moblin King Mutoh and his Knights King of Red Lions King Zora Know-it-All Brothers Knuckle Kokkosan Komali Kortz Koume and Kotake Koun Bouya Kukiel Laruto Ledd Lenzo Levias Librari Light Spirits Linda Linebeck Linebeck III Link Link’s relatives Link-goro Lokomos Madame Aroma Madame MeowMeow Madamu Yokuriiba Mad Batter Malladus Majora’s Mask Makar Maku Trees Malladus Malon and Talon Mama Mamamu Yan Mamba and the Yamatani King Manbo Man of Smiles Map Kid Maple and Syrup Masaru Master Eddo Master Stalfos Mayor Bo Mayor Dotour Mayor Hagen Mayor Plen Mayor Ruul Medli Melari Merco Merman Mia Midna Mido Mikau Mila and Maggie Minister Potho Miss Marie Monpe Moonlight Merchant Mr Akindo Mr. Write Nackle Nabooru Naked Salona Navi Netabare Nightmares Nimimamu Nimisutoppu Nyave and Nyeve Obli and Willi Ocean King (Oshus) Oinker Couple Oinker King Old Man and Old Woman Old Man Ho Ho Old Man Ulrira and Grandma Ulrira Old Wayfarer Oocoo Ook Oousotsukisama Ordon Village Kids Orielle (and Parrow) Pamela Papahl Parts Patch Peatrice and Peater Pergie and Jaggle Phantom Guide Photographer Pierre and Bonooru Piita Pinkle Piper Pipit Plats Port Town Adults Port Town Kids Postman Professor Shikashi Pumm Purdy Purlo Queen Ambi Queen Bee Quill Rabbit Rescuer Rabu-ya Rafton Raia Raion Ralis Ralph Rauru Rem Renado Richard Ricky, Moosh and Dimitri River Devil River Man Romanos Ronny Rosa Rosa Sisters Rupin Russel Rusl Rusta Ruto Sahasrahla Sale Salvage Corp. Salvatore Saria Scervo Schule Donavitch Scrapper Segaare Sera Shigumasento Shiro Silva Simon Skipper Skull Kid and Friends Soal Sokra Sorceress Veran Sparrot Spirits of Good Spirits of Power, Wisdom, and Courage Stockwell Sturgeon and Orca Sweetie Sue-Belle Teacher Teddy Todo Telma Tetra’s Crew Three Dragons Tingle Tingle's Uncle Tomato Scarecrow Torimushi Tott Trill Tubert Tyto Uli Uncle Rupee Vaati Valoo Vasu Viscen Wannappuchan Wheaton and Pita Wind Fish Wyrna Yamori Yeto and Yeta Zant Zanc Zauz Zelda Zill Zephos and Cyclos Zonmi Zora Zunari ============================================================================= ? ? ? The Hand that Rocks the Toilet Race: ??? Appearances: Majora’s Mask Oracle of Ages Skyward Sword Wow, what a way to start off the guide. So what we have here is...a hand, that appears out of the Stock Pot Inn’s toilet. But only at night. And whatever it’s attached to is never revealed, although personally I like to think it’s just a hand and no more. Or maybe there’s a Dead Hand skulking down there, man, I don’t know. In all three of its appearances, ??? requires some kind of paper from you. Yeah. This can be anything, from any any type of Title Deed to a note for Kafei from his mother. In the case of Oracle of Ages, Link offers up some Postman-brand Stationery. Here, though, ??? lives in a hole in a house in Lynna City, so it may not be a toilet. On the other hand (so to speak), he gives Link the Stink Bag in return. That was a little less welcome of a reward than the Heart Piece he’d previously rolled out. Oh and by the way, ??? is actually listed as such in the Bombers Notebook. I mean, I find it kind of interesting that he even HAS an entry in the Bombers Notebook. ??? also makes a reappearance out of absolutely nowhere, figuring into a Skyward Sword sidequest. Midway through the game, reports will surface of a woman wailing in the Academy dormitories at nighttime. As it turns out, what is thought to be a terrifying spectre is just ???, a disembodied female hand (...) in need of, as always, some paper. After Link discovers this, Cawlin gives him a Love Letter intended for Karane, his crush, in hopes that he'll deliver it for him. Link then has a choice: He can either deliver it as intended, in which case ??? will disappear, forlorn; or he can provide her with the paper she needs, at which point she will read the letter, think it's for her, and spend every night thereafter caressing Cawlin's ear in his sleep, to his obvious discomfort. As a reward for helping her find love, Link gets a bunch of five Gratitude Crystals. Come to think of it, this is probably one of the more mysterious characters in the Zelda universe. Wonderful. ============================================================================= A g a h n i m Sorcerer-puppet Race: Hylian Appearances: A Link to the Past Link’s Awakening Oracle of Seasons Shortly before the beginning of A Link to the Past, perhaps a year, an endless chain of catastrophic natural disasters befell Hyrule. Typhoons, earthquakes and floods wracked the land, causing massive collateral damage and killing many people. Their origin could not be discerned, and they were so large even the best magicians failed to end the threat. The King of Hyrule could only watch in despair as his kingdom was slowly worn down. Just when it seemed Hyrule was ready to give out, a wizard from a faraway land appeared and, with some effort, put a stop to everything that was happening. He was greeted as a hero and the King gratefully took him on as advisor. With his suggestions taken into account, Hyrule prospered once again. But in reality, well...Ganon is many things, but an idiot is not one of them. After a previous duel with Link, he was imprisoned in the Golden Land, where he stayed for hundreds of years. All this time, he plotted a means of escape, transforming it into the sinister Dark World over time. Agahnim actually was a kind wizard to begin with, so how he got to be under Ganon’s dominion is unclear. At any rate, Ganon possesses the poor old man to use as his puppet, then begins to exert his growing magical power on the Light World. When the people of Hyrule are at their most desperate, he sends a false saviour to them. Through Agahnim, Ganon is able to manipulate the Light World to his ends. Agahnim begins sacrificing maidens late at night in Hyrule Castle’s tallest tower, in the hopes of breaking the barrier between the worlds. After Link collects the Pendants of Power, Courage, and Wisdom, he is able to draw the Master Sword from its pedestal in the Lost Woods. When he re-emerges, Agahnim has kidnapped Zelda from the Sanctuary, a place she thought was safe and unknown to him. Link ascends Hyrule Castle and duels with Agahnim. In this fight, Agahnim’s main attack is to throw coloured balls of magical energy at Link, but they can easily be deflected with the Master Sword. The idea is to smack it back into Agahnim’s body, damaging him with his own magic. He also has a very powerful attack where he shoots lightning out of his hands, but it’s so predictable and easy to avoid (just head for one of the room’s corners) that it isn’t much of a threat. After he’s beaten, he falls down dead, but Ganon uses the last of his presence in the Light World to warp Link to the Dark World, where things are looking bleak, both literally and figuratively. Agahnim reappears later in the game, as the boss of the final dungeon, Ganon’s Tower. Here, he gains the ability to briefly become invisible, and some of his magical orb attacks can’t be deflected. He can also create two shadow clones of himself, which can distract Link with potentially fatal consequences if he doesn’t know which ones are which, but their attacks pass right through him. Other than that, his attack pattern is the same. At the end of Link’s Awakening, the final boss is a collection of foes from previous games, and Agahnim is one of them. As with A Link to the Past, to defeat him you have to deflect his only attack back at him. This form is pathetically easy. Some people say that it’s easier to deflect his attacks with the Shovel rather than the Sword, which is not true. Agahnim also made one final appearance in Oracle of Seasons as the mini-boss of Level 3, Poison Moth’s Lair. This one works a little differently. The room starts off dark, with Agahnim and two clones. There are two torches in the middle of the room, around which the three hover. Link must light the torches with Ember Seeds from his Seed Satchel, then quickly examine all three assailants before the light goes out again. The one who casts a shadow is the real Agahnim, and the only one who can be hurt, by being repeatedly bashed with a sword. All three can damage Link, however, and it can be tricky to get a hit in while trying to avoid attacks. It’s never explained how what was once a powerful figure became relegated to a forgettable mini-boss, but I’d guess this incarnation was an invention of Ganon. ============================================================================= A g i t h a Probably doesn’t deserve to be third on the list Race: Hylian Appearances: Twilight Princess Agitha is a very strange girl who loves bugs. Specifically, she’s looking for 24 golden members of the phylum arthropoda, which she asks Link to seek out so that she can hold Agitha’s Ball at her house, called Agitha’s Castle. She makes funny little noises, and the way she talks (in third person, for one thing) and the way she acts have caused some to question her sanity. She even sends Link a letter telling him about a fairly...interesting dream she has. Also, she has a peeping tom. ============================================================================= A l f o n z o Comfortingly familiar Race: Hylian Appearances: Spirit Tracks Although he bears an uncanny resemblance to Gonzo in both name and body, possibly an indication of direct lineage, you’ll quickly realise that Alfonzo is a totally new character with a personal history of his own. Long before the game opens, he was a legendary swordsman in the ranks of the Royal Guard, sworn to protect his liege and homeland with all the might within him. He was generally regarded as the single strongest warrior in the country’s short history, with the possible exception of Link. However, for one reason or another he eventually left the order to pursue a career as a train conductor (mid-life crisis?), which is why we find him a Royal Engineer and our own mentor as we begin the game. After reminding Link of the basics of train operation, Alfonzo lauds his natural talent for the task but waits by the vehicle while Link heads for the castle to receive his engineering certificate from Princess Zelda. When, to his surprise, Link actually brings the girl back with him when he returns, he hears her out and immediately decides to help her reach the Tower of Spirits, like the hero he really is. When the trio finds themselves ambushed at the hands of Chancellor Cole and his lackey, Byrne, only minutes later, Alfonzo steps in to fend them off but is roundly defeated. He spends the next segment of the game in bed at the Castle, recovering from his injuries, but is well enough to travel by the time Link vanquishes the Forest Temple, and asks the young ‘un to deliver him back to Aboda Village, their mutual hometown. Once here, he assembles a cannon for the Spirit Train and links it up, finally allowing Link to fight back when assaulted by the monsters and Bokoblins who harry him at every frickin’ turn in this game. This act signals Alfonzo’s departure from anything of very great importance, but from here on in he provides the service of switching out your train cars for you as you please, in order to attain maximum coolness and Heart Bonus and whatnot, free of charge even. ============================================================================= A n j e a n Lokomo leader Race: Lokomo Appearances: Spirit Tracks At 100 years old, Anjean was present when Tetra, Link and whoever else finally made landfall as their years-long sojourn finally came to an end. By her own testimony, she knew the erstwhile Princess of Hyrule rather well, and entrusted her with the Spirit Flute that she would later pass down to the Zelda of Spirit Tracks. As a member of the tribe sworn to protect humanity on behalf of the spirits, Anjean was also likely a participant in the first battle to chain the evil demon king Malladus. Some people like to point out that Anjean and Tetra have a similar hairstyle, as if that means something. Her name is a pun on the word ‘engine,’ the train part. The Link of Zelda of the Spirit Tracks era encounter her early on at the Tower of Spirits, and she immediately becomes the quest-dealer, dishing out both storyline and objectives. Eventually, she starts to ride around with them on the Spirit Train, and is present for the final battle. She and Byrne seem to have some history; it seems to be she who saves his life after his apparent death at the hands of Malladus. ============================================================================= A n j u a n d K a f e i Star-cross’d lovers Race: Hylians Appearances: Majora’s Mask The Skull Kid, under the influence of Majora’s Mask, commits all manner of deeds which he apparently views as mere mischief, but which are really quite taxing on their recipients. As the game begins, Anju and Kafei are set to be married in three days. However, the Skull Kid has transformed Kafei into a child! Kafei can’t bear to show his face in this state, so he spends most of his time hanging around the back room of the Curiosity Shop. He goes to great lengths to ensure nobody finds out who he is. He arranges for the postman to give a special signal when he delivers any mail to Kafei, and when the man-boy does venture out, he wears a Keaton’s Mask and refuses to talk to anyone. Through the longest and most complicated side-quest in the game, you can reunite them: FIRST DAY -The mayor, the Captain of the Guard and the chief carpenter are arguing in the mayor’s office. Talk to the mayor’s wife, Madame Aroma. She’ll give you Kafei’s Mask, which allows you to interrogate people as to whether or not they’ve seen her son. -Listen to Anju’s and the postman’s conversation at the Stock Pot Inn – Anju is the innkeeper. The postman knows where Kafei is, but won’t tell. He would never sell out a friend, I guess. -Talk to Anju. She’ll screw up and give away somebody else’s room to you. Talk to her again to arrange a midnight meeting. -At midnight, meet Anju in the Stock Pot Inn’s kitchen. She’ll ask you to deliver a letter, even though she could have just done it herself with much less effort. Put it in any mailbox. SECOND DAY -Witness the postman delivering the letter. Talk to Kafei in the Curiosity Shop’s back room. He’ll give you the Pendant of Memories. -Return a little later. The owner will be there now. He has the Keaton’s Mask and the Express Mail to Mama. Deliver the latter to Madame Aroma to receive an empty Bottle. Alternately, give it the postman to get the Postman’s Hat later on. -Sakon, a local malcontent, stole Kafei’s Sun’s Mask, which is basically an engagement ring. (Sakon steals other junk too.) Break into his hideout in Ikana Canyon, accidentally activate the security system, and work through it, finally recovering the mask. This marks the first time in Zelda history that players were able to control someone other than Link. The focus shifted between Link fighting Deku Babas on one half of the security system and Kafei solving block puzzles on the other. With this complete, Link went to see them in the Employees Only room of the Stock Pot Inn. Kafei finally showed up, but not until the last hour before the moon hit home. Kafei still looks like a child O_o but they marry each other in a private and hasty ceremony in which they exchange the Sun’s and Moon’s Masks, respectively. This forms the Couple’s Mask, which they give to Link in thanks. This is truly one of the most emotional scenes in the series, I think. They hold each other, crying, and say they will greet the coming morning, together. This is kind of sad, because they know that the instant dawn arrives, the moon will make planetfall and they’ll both die. It’s even sadder if you make a mistake and are unable to recover the Sun’s Mask; if you screw up, you don’t have another shot until you reset the three day timer and do everything over. If this happens, Anju will still go to the Employees Only room to wait for Kafei, but he doesn’t show up, no matter how long you wait. Anju dies alone in extreme grief. Depressing, isn’t it? But wait! For every side-quest you complete that yields a Happy Mask as its reward, you get to watch an additional segment of the ending cutscene when you

The Legend of Zelda Series Character Guide

by Canadian Dude   Updated to v1.4 on

/\ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /________________\ /\ /\ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ / \ /________________\/________________\ ZELDA SERIES CHARACTER GUIDE by Jacob Rothenburger =~=TABLE OF CONTENTS=~= Introduction [INT] Version History [VER] Zelda Series Overview [SUM] The Meat of the Guide [MEA] Races Compendium [RAC] Ladies’ Man [LAD] Thanks [THA] Legal Garbage [LEG] Contact Information [CON] In Closing [INC] Those numbers in [ ] are to allow you to quickly access the part of the guide you want to view. Use your Ctrl+F function (on John Hodgemans, I’m not sure what it is for Jason Longs) to jump to where you need to be. For example, if you wanted to see the Billy Bob section, whose code was [BIL], you would press Ctrl+F, then type in ‘[BIL]’, then click ‘Find Next’ twice. Boom! There you are! It saves on scrolling through the whole document to find what you need. =~=INTRODUCTION=~= [INT] The Legend of Zelda is my favourite video game series, bar none. I am a FAQs author. It follows that I would want to write a Legend of Zelda FAQs. Unfortunately for me, I’m far from the only one who subscribes to this way of thinking. Quite a few other people like Zelda, too. And I'm not up to doing a walkthrough. These two factors combined mean that any walkthrough I were to write just wouldn’t be able to compete. So in a way, I guess this guide is my way around that. Because I’m pro at NPCs. I actually consider myself a walking encyclopaedia of the Zelda universe – I’m a real ‘ask me anything’ kind of guy when we’re talking Zelda. That’s not arrogance, it’s just the truth. Well ok, it’s also arrogance. So, inspired by various other Nintendo-franchise character and ending guides (props to them), I composed this one. Snazzy, isn’t it? Of course, I’m not nearly as talented as some of those authors, but I hope you enjoy my work as much as I've enjoyed theirs. And when you're done, check out their stuff as well. The very first version of this guide contained 69 entries. Obviously, that is far, far fewer than the number of characters in the series. But most of them are just not important enough to merit lengthening the guide; if I actually went over every single one, we’d have a document 1,000 gigs long, and it would be mostly uninteresting and redundant. Speaking of redundancy, some characters have been culled to keep the thing from growing too long. But back to what I was saying, initially I viewed various resources to find lists of characters. Characters were considered for inclusion if they met one of the following criteria: (1) It played a significant role in the storyline of at least one Zelda game (2) It played multiple roles of moderate importance (storyline or otherwise) (3) It intrigues me personally This method held up very well for the first few versions, at which point I unconsciously changed the rule to 'any named character' (and with entries like Flute Boy’s, even that boundary is starting to fray). And if I didn’t happen to know what it was, it’s not in the guide. On top of that, my new method only applies to games from Twilight Princess onward (at which point I started playing new games consciously thinking about which characters would go in and what I might write about them while still playing through.) As you can see, the basis for selection is painfully arbitrary. If you take a look and you see that this guide lacks a character you believe should be included, please let me know. That about wraps it up. Onward, and enjoy. =~=Version History=~= [VER] :-Version 1.0 (11.13.06)-: The initial version of this guide; the state it was in when first posted on GameFAQs. :-Version 1.1 (12.17.06)-: I’m never rushing another guide. Trying to get this one out left large gaps, an inability to edit for errors before posting and some entertaining but scandalous silliness, such as my having accidentally left the placeholder ‘DATE GOES HEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEERE’ for the date index for Version 1.0. So I’ve fixed most of those. -Created a few new character entries (Grog, Zephos and Cyclos, and some characters from Tingle RPG), edited some others and created a whole new section, the Races Compendium. -Some other information has been added as well, mostly little things. :-Version 1.2 (02.09.07)-: Finally added all the information for Twilight Princess, added some profiles I neglected to put in from before, and fixed some errors. :-Version 1.3 (05.03.10)—: Didn’t manage to get it out in time for Spirit Tracks, but everything’s in there now. Edited for accuracy and readability. Changed ‘Boss Bokoblin’ to ‘King Bulblin.’ Added information for Phantom Hourglass and some Mogitate Chinkuru characters; about freaking time. A ton more profiles from other games went in as well, including some I can’t believe I forgot. :-Version 1.4 (xx.yy.12)-: A few characters went in who should have already been there, but more significantly I've finally (finally!) added the information for Mogitate Chinkuru, Irodzuki Chinkuru and Skyward Sword. This is my biggest update yet. =~=Zelda Series Overview=~= [SUM] Before we get to the character section itself, I thought I’d give you a brief look at the Zelda series as a whole. New players might have trouble keeping up, and returning ones might like a recap, so hopefully this section will help you avoid confusion. If you’re a seasoned Hyrulean veteran, you can feel free to skip right over this section, or read it for posterity. It’s probably worth a skim. There are a couple of things to keep in mind here. Mainly, there is NO one definitive timeline for the Zelda series. Certainly, there was one published on zelda.com years back, in 2011 Aonuma's team released the completely nonsensical one they've been using internally, and you can devise innumerable fan timelines if you apply certain rules to the universe (Kirby021591’s is one of the best; check out any of his Zelda walkthroughs to find it), but really, it’s all guesswork. Aonuma Eiji, the dude currently in charge of the Zelda franchise, has stated he eventually intends to solidify the overarching story, but I’ll believe it when I see it. It’s probably most convenient to think of each game as self-contained, except in instances where the events of one game explicitly reference others (for example, Majora’s Mask is irrefutably a direct sequel to Ocarina of Time) to make a pair. I could say a lot more on the subject, but I’ll contain myself. The next issue is caused by the first. Many weapons, items and –characters-recur from one game to the next. Sometimes it’s possible they’re the same thing (for instance, How many Mirror Shields can there possibly be? one must ask oneself) whereas others are cosmetically different but functionally identical items, like certain bows. Others, like the Hookshot, may just be variations on the same design. It’s impossible to know. As for characters, many of them appear in multiple time periods. Some just live a really long time (Impa, the Great Deku Tree, Jr), some apparently time-travel (Tingle) and still others have no explanation for their presence (Beedle, Zill.) Oh yeah, and of course some have alternate-universe, ancient ancestor, or reincarnation versions. Sifting through endless layers of ambiguity is fun, no? The years of release are for the North American versions. Actually, I guess just about all the information in this guide comes from the North American versions, but anyway other regions may be different. The Legend of Zelda Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu Nintendo Entertainment System Released: 1986 Since there’s no clear storyline, let’s look at them one-by-one, in the order that they emerged in the real world. That means we kick-start the section with the original Legend of Zelda. Being that it’s the first one in the series, it’s hard to write about, because if you look at it from an industry standpoint, everything’s an innovation, and if you look at it from a series standpoint, everything’s a franchise standard. But look! I just took up a whole paragraph talking about the paragraph itself! Well played, self. *congratulates self* I might as well say SOMETHING, though, so let’s do a brief overview. Ganon, evil pig lord and main villain of the series, possesses the Triforce of Power, and seeks to earn the Triforce of Wisdom as well. (No Triforce of Courage, that came later.) But it was Princess Zelda who had Wisdom, and when he tried to take it from her, she magically broke it into eight pieces and hid the shards in a collection of dangerous catacombs throughout Hyrule. On a chance encounter, Zelda’s handmaiden Impa apprised a lad named Link of the situation, and he took charge, recovered the pieces after many harrowing adventures, and finally gained the power to face Ganon head-on. In the process, he introduced many elements that would later become Zelda staples, like the acquisition of tools, inevitable confrontations with bosses and the magic number eight (in regards to the number of dungeons a game contains, plus the final level.) Hmm...on second thought, I guess that wasn’t so hard to write about, after all. Zelda II: The Adventure of Link Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Rinku no Bouken Nintendo Entertainment System Released: 1988 Man, I hate this game so much. I finally got a copy almost four years ago, and I’m still stuck on the fourth level. (Edit: I did eventually beat it.) If I wanted Castlevania-style gameplay, I would play Castlevania. If you don’t know what I’m talking about, Zelda II is completely different from others in the series. Others have a top-down or 3D perspective, but Zelda II has a top-down overworld view, then switches to an action side-scroller for random battle and dungeon sequences. This is because it wasn’t an adventure game, but an action-RPG – and I myself was skilled in neither the action nor the RPG genre. For me, this game is frickin’ HARD (while I laughed out loud when I read that someone had tried over twenty times to beat Ganon in Ocarina of Time – I did it one try and only took about ten hearts of damage, and I know that’s a lot worse than some people. It all depends on your personal skills, eh?) But on the bright side, Zelda II (stupid, stupid title) introduced magic spells to Link’s arsenal, some of which are VERY cool, to say nothing of the exceptionally well-done finale. The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Kamigami no Toraifousu Super Nintendo Entertainment System Released: 1992 Ha ha, get it? Get it?? A Link to the Past is the second of three Zelda games with irritating English titles. It was renamed because Triforce of the Gods sounded too religious. But let’s move on, before my trend of failing to talk about the game itself gets out of hand. Past is one of the games that many consider to be the best in the series. The pak made the important contribution of the Master Sword, which has stood long since – the first Zelda had a Magical Sword, but who knows what the story is there. Though not in terms of hours, it’s also the longest to date: There was an introductory dungeon, then a set of three, then a set of seven and THEN the final boss dungeon. But what really set it apart was its Light World/Dark World feature. You see, the Golden Land of the Triforce was originally a mirror image of Hyrule (the Light World), with minor differences. Ganon’s evil transformed it into the Dark World. You eventually gained the ability to travel between the two, and navigating the world suddenly became insanely fun. Use the Rooster to fly to Death Mountain...plumb the depths of the caves...come out on a ledge near a portal to the Dark World...jump down a ways...use the Magic Mirror to return to the Light World...then go left a ways and you’re there at last. True story. The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Yume wo Miru Shima Gameboy Released: 1993 Apparently as a result of player demand, the Big N finally cranked out some portable Moblin-bashing. By some interpretations, Link’s Awakening is a direct sequel to A Link to the Past. Either way, on a voyage to condition his body and mind in preparation for possible future catastrophes, Link is shipwrecked and wakes up on Koholint Island. I don’t know what a Koholint is, but the Japanese title seems to literally be ‘island that sees a dream,’ or Dreaming Island (I’m a learner of Japanese.) Anyway, Koholint Island is quite an interesting place, from the giant egg that sits on its tallest mountain to the village populated entirely by talking animals. Link quested to enter the egg with the eight Instruments of the Sirens, and find a way back home. I like this game a lot. The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Toki no Okarina Nintendo 64 Released: 1998 Probably the most popular Zelda title. I can see why, but...amazing graphics aren’t everything, guys. (And you young ones snickering at them? Shut up. They were stupendous at the time.) At any rate, the level design is more than competent and the mix of old and new is commendable. Ocarina of Time built on some of the core elements of A Link to the Past, including its 3/5 dungeon dichotomy, the method by which the Master Sword is gained, and the dual-world scheme – though in this case, it’s the present and future of the same world rather than two separate worlds, and your ability to switch between the two is severely limited. Anyway, a fine entry indeed. The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Majora no Kamen Nintendo 64 Released: 2000 Ocarina of Time was so well received, they decided to release a direct sequel to it, utilising the same engine and resources. To me, this makes Ocarina that much less special, but once I got into it (Majora’s Mask takes a while to get moving) I ended up liking it even better. This one is set in a parallel version of Hyrule, called Termina. They have a somewhat similar world. You’ll meet many of the same characters, this time with names, but Termina is more tribal than civic. Oh yeah, and the game’s main antagonist has set the moon on a collision course that will obliterate the planet, plus Hyrule. The three-day time limit can be reset again and again, but this also resets events – all you’ll keep is the items you’ve collected, which is enough. The jury’s out on this one; you’ll find the three-day system either brilliant, or annoying as hell. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Seasons Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Fushigi no Ko no Mi Daichi no Shou Gameboy Colour Released: 2001 During development, Oracle of Seasons and Ages were originally called ‘gaiden,’ meaning side-stories. That’s not entirely inaccurate. You could even go as far as to say they were just to keep players going between console entries, but even if that’s true they are still excellent standalone adventures. Nut of the Mysterious Tree: Chapter of Earth is the easier and less interesting of the two. This one tracked Link as he used the Rod of Seasons, a magical device that he could use to change the seasons at will, to deny General Onox his dream of conquering Holodrum. The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Fushigi no Ko no Mi Jikuu no Shou Gameboy Colour Released: 2001 Released concurrently with Oracle of Seasons, Nut of the Mysterious Tree: Chapter of Time and Space is more puzzle-oriented, and probably the superior game overall. We were a little squeamish when we found out that Zelda had been handed out to Capcom, but it all turned out all right. Link gained the Harp of Ages, another time-travelling instrument – as well as one that allowed another dual-world system, this one being the present and 400 years in the past. Link used it to fight the Sorceress Veran as she strove to conquer Labrynna. The biggest feature of the Oracle games was that when you completed one, you got a password. This password could be entered into the other game when you started a new file, allowing you to start off with the Wooden Sword (instead of looking for it) and an extra Heart Container. It also unlocked additional content and many special items unavailable the first time through. The Legend of Zelda: Four Swords Japanese: Zeruda no Densetsu: Yottsu no Tsurugi Gameboy Advance Released: 2002 When A Link to the Past was re-released for GBA, it also included a small, multiplayer-only game on the same pak. It introduced a new villain, Vaati, and had the players attempt madcap challenges as they cooperated to complete a level, yet competed to collect the most Rupees. While it got even more fun as more players were added, most people who bought the re-release probably didn’t have the hardware needed for Four Swords. The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker

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