Cracking Descriptive Essay

The descriptive writing test is a part of the recruitment process of upcoming IBPS PO, OICL AO and SSC Tier-III exams. The art of descriptive writing is the art of discovering the ways to express your opinion in a precise and clear manner which might seem as a challenge to many candidates as they might not know from where to start! But don’t worry now with Adda247’s Guide to Descriptive Writing which covers pattern, tips, and examples of Letter, Essay, and Précis Writing you can easily learn the approach and crack descriptive paper of upcoming examination.

We are providing our readers with a new edition of A Guide to Descriptive Writing eBook where we've covered essays and letters on many important current affairs based topics of last 4-5 months. You can get the Descriptive Writing ebook from store.adda247 for a nominal price of 199/-

Essay Writing

With essay writing the main issue that you might face is how to start an essay and how to structure your points/facts/ideas in a paragraph to express your views. Yes, there is a set format that for even essay writing that you must keep in mind. And you’ll get to know that through this ebook for descriptive writing.

An essay is a long composition that can be asked on any topic, especially on the topics related to current issues, or the issues that are drawing everybody’s attention. You’ll get solved examples of essays on most frequently asked topics like Demonetisation, Caste Based Reservation in India, Climate Catastrophe, Social Media etc. and Current Affairs based trending topics like Doklam Issue, Blue Whale Challenge, World War-III, Cryptocurrency, Right to Privacy, Prompt Corrective Action, Bullet Train, Can India go Cashless?, Challenges After GST Implementation etc.

Through this ebook you can also learn key point and write an essay on insurance and Banking related topics like Financial Inclusion, Merger of banks, Insurance Penetration etc. You must attempt to write essays on the questions of this practice exercise as this will not only help you test your skills of essay writing but also will boost your confidence. Do remember the word limit of 150-250 words while writing an essay as you must keep it precise and not verbose.

Letter Writing

In recent competitive exams, we’ve seen letter to the editor and informal letters were the hot topics asked in the descriptive paper. While writing a letter one should keep in mind to write letters that get your message across without the reader calling you for clarification. Letters shouldn't be verbose and usually, in competitive exams, there is a prescribed word limit.

To help you understand the art and pattern of letter writing we have included tips and letter writing aids of both Formal and Informal Letter separately, along with solved examples of Letter to Editor, Complaint Letter, Grievance Redressal Letter, Formal Invitation etc. in Formal Letter Category and Personal Letter/ Expression of Concern, Condolence Letter, Informal Invitation, Letter of Congratulations, Thank You Letter/ Gratitude Expression etc. in the Informal Letter Category.

Précis Writing

Like a fluid, writing is compressible and a compressed form of any long passage is termed as précis writing. Précis is still asked in some competitive exams and it is all about writing down the summary of a given passage best expressing the passage as clearly as briefly as possible. Through this ebook you can understand the key features of précis writing the writing process with some important tips and solved examples

Some features associated with this book are:

  • Format and useful writing tips for Letter, Essay and Précis writing.
  • Incorporates all popular and expected topics for Essay writing.
  • Solved examples of different types of formal and informal letters asked in competitive exams.
  • Practice Exercise of Letter Writing. 
  • Expected Essay Writing Topics Based on Current Affairs.

Get A Guide to Descriptive Writing eBook - Edition 2

All the best for your preparation and upcoming exams !!


           

We’ve heard the old montage “Show, don’t tell” so many times that it’s become stale–and what does it mean, anyway? It’s an easy phrase to utter, but how do you achieve resonant, meaningful description that will make your words come alive? This simple checklist, from The Writer’s Little Helperby James V. Smith, Jr., is a concise list of best practices for creating rich imagery that will have your readers clamoring for more.

  • Paint the image in small bites. Never stop your story to describe. Keep it going, incorporating vivid images, enlarging the action, and putting the dialogue in context.

A sponge carpet of pine needles covered the trail. It cushioned their soles and absorbed the sounds of their footsteps.
Rhonda stopped short and whispered, “Something’s coming. There. To the right. A bear?”

  • Incorporate images into action. Suppose I had written:

A million years of discarded pine needles lay on the forest floor, carpeting the trail.

That’s description. Static. The author’s talking. Can you hear him reading from an encyclopedia? The difference in the first version is tying their walking to soundless footsteps. This clears the way for Rhonda to hear and see.

She pointed at a looming hulk, for all the good that pointing would do in the ink of night.
Bill grasped her arm. “No. It couldn’t be.”
But the crashing of brush told them it could.
“Yes. Get up a tree.”

  • See through the character’s eyes. Hear through her ears. When you can, use the character’s senses instead of the author’s. It’s called character point of view.

She felt her pulse both in her throat and under the grip of that hand of his crushing her forearm. His breath. She heard it in short, chattering bursts. She smelled it, too. Fear stunk.

  • Use the tiny but telling detail.

She tore free of his grip and leaped off the trail. A spider’s web tugged at her face. Any other time she would have screamed. She ran into a tree, a rough pine bough slapped her breasts, and needles stabbed at her eyes. Any other time she would have cursed.

The spider’s web. Ever ran into one?

  • Choose action-bearing verbs. Cushioned, absorbed, stopped, whispered, pointed, grasped, tore, leaped, tugged, screamed, ran, slapped, stabbed, cursed. These words do so much more than say what is. They indicate first fear, then panic.
  • Choose action-bearing non-verbs. Looming is a verb form used as an adjective. Crashing is used as a noun.
  • Invent fresh viewpoints.

She climbed blindly. And so quickly. Like a ladder. That was scary. If she could scale this pine so easily, couldn’t the bear climb it, too?
She drove her head into a branch. But the sound of crying wasn’t hers.
“Help. It’s got me.”
Bill. Oh, God, Bill.
The bear had him. Still she climbed, seeing nothing but sparklers of pain in her head.
He shrieked at her from the dark below.
She did not—could not—respond.

This is the viewpoint of a woman in panic and pain. When she looks into the darkness, she sees only sparklers. Clearly, she’s so frightened, she’s only trying to save herself.

  • Create an image without saying so.

The pine limbs now bent like those of a Christmas tree. A fresh breeze chilled her skin.
“Bill,” she whispered. “Speak to me, for God’s sake, speak to me, Bill.”
But he did not. All she could hear was snorting and thrashing. She put a hand to her mouth. She thought she might scream but nothing came out of her mouth. Fear of attracting the bear kept her quiet. The pitch on her hand glued her lips shut.
And, yes, the shame. That silenced her, too.
The thin limbs bending and the fresh breeze tells us Rhonda has climbed high into the tree. The chill tells us she’s been sweating. And the pitch, though she and we didn’t notice it in the climbing, is there on her hands and face.

The Writer’s Little Helper is filled with dynamic fiction-writing advice. It’s packed with big ideas, time-saving tips, and revision-made-easy charts–everything you need to know in order to create memorable characters, maintain a compelling pace, craft believable dialogue, and much more!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now let’s have some fun. In the comments, rewrite the following sentence into a more imagery-rich one using one or more the techniques described above.

The ancient floorboards creaked beneath her cold, bare feet as she paced the room apprehensively.


Rachel’s Pick of the Week

The Daily Writer: 366 Meditations to Cultivate a Productive and Meaningful Writing Life by Fred White

Everyone needs a dose of writing inspiration now and then, and this book contains an entire year’s worth: tidbits, excerpts, reflections, and advice to inspire the novice or seasoned writer. I love how each day’s entry comes with an exercise, so you can enhance your writing skills as you seek out inspiration.


 

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CATEGORIES
Craft & Technique, Excerpts, How to Improve Writing Skills, Literary Fiction Writing, There Are No Rules Blog by the Editors of Writer's Digest, Writing Science Fiction & Fantasy, Writing Your First Draft

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